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Essay Plus Size Models

Essay about Urging the Acceptance of Plus Size Fashion

1589 Words7 Pages

Throughout the centuries, history finds women doing whatever they can to fit into the current cookie cutter mold of popular, accepted society. From the whale bone corsets of the late 1800s to the psychedelic style of hippies in the 1960s and 1970s, one major trend that followed these fashions through the ages is weight. For the past fifty years or so, since the dawn of models like Twiggy and Verushka von Lehndorff, the world turned away from the “plus size” and opened its arms only to the phenomenon of thin. But what did society think of plus sized fashion in a time when thin was unaccepted? A web article from articalesbase.com sheds some light on the subject: “In the past, a big beautiful body was associated with health and wealth.…show more content…

She continues, explaining that the “ideal” woman (portrayed by models and movie stars) is 5’7”, weighs only 100 pounds, and wears a size 8 (Lacey). These figures indict an alarming fact: sizes generally consider as “plus sizes”, are, in actually, “real sizes”, worn by the majority of women in the United States of America. Yet still, many designers, especially high fashion designers, ignore the majority and design for the aforementioned ideal woman. Many stores carry plus sizes (Target, DEB), but only up to 16W or 18W, and generally, these are mainly just larger version of smaller fashion, most of which are not meant for a more voluptuous body. Other stores specifically carry styles designed to cover up and hide curves in ill designed drapes, not flaunt them (Fig 1). Still other stores offer plus sizes, but only over the internet (Old Navy, Forever 21, GAP), as though all plus size women lack the need to try anything on. Rarely do stores cater to the needs of bigger women. In an industry as cutthroat as the apparel industry, why would retailers choose to remove something that specifically caters to a large group of women? “It’s not that everybody’s 20 pounds above average…You can’t make something for somebody who’s 200 [pounds] and expect it to fit somebody who’s 240 [pounds]” explains fashion blogger and author

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Plus Size Models Encouraging Obessity Essay

Step out into the everyday world as an average American and you will witness an entanglement of varied body size, and shape. Now, enter the world of the media, a world in which you are formally introduced to high fashion, where flashing lights, money, glamour and riches crash around you, satiating every crevice of your being. Here, you will find two unified body types, divided into two categories of shape in women; thin, and thick. Naturally, any woman who wishes to someday strut down the catwalk in Zac Posen, or pose in Marie Claire wearing Dolce and Cabana must have a body that fits one of these required molds, right? It is a well-known reality that many women who cannot reach by healthy means, or do not already have, the desired body type for fashion industries, will develop an eating disorder to starve their way into the position. However, most fail to address the issue of obesity that curdles on the other end of the physical spectrum; the plus size modeling industry. This statement not only boils the blood of millions of American Women, but begs the question: If extremely thin models promote eating disorders, should we prohibit advertisers, especially those in fashion, from using plus size models, as they may promote obesity? To put it simply, no. Plus size models do not promote obesity because they only provide thicker, much larger women, confidence and appreciation for their body without pressuring them to take unhealthy means to shed pounds; they do not encourage overeating and lack of exercise.
When modeling started to evolve into thinner customs 20 years ago, the average weight of a model was about 8% less than that of an average woman. Currently, that percentage has plummeted into an insidious 23%. In the year 2003, Teen magazine reported that 35% of girls that lie between the ages of six and twelve have been on at least one diet plan, while the 50-70 % of young girls who qualify as a healthy weight believe themselves to be overweight. They concluded with their overall research claiming that 90% of all women are dissatisfied with their body. In fact, one can construe from these results that only an industry with a large amount of interaction with the people and reaction by the people, can influence such a delusional mindset. All fingers and data charts point to rail thin models, and the designers and institutions who endorse them.
Anorexia: a disease in which one starves, or compulsively limits food intake for fear of becoming overweight and bulimia: a condition in which bouts of overeating are followed by under eating, use of laxatives, or self-induced vomiting, are both mental diseases associated with depression and anxiety about putting on weight. Both of these disorders are current and irrevocable issues that plague the regimen of models who gear themselves up for the runway, or prepare themselves for the excruciatingly detailed fashion shoot that waits for them next Monday. These models are paid in exchange for their...

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