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Grade 1 Homework Packets For 3rd

First Grade Math Practice Helps Kids Make the Grade

Some students are ahead of the math game by the time they reach first grade, while others might move at a slower pace. No matter what end of the math continuum your first-grader finds himself, he’ll find helpful resources with our first grade math worksheets. From color-by-sum and dot-to-dot worksheets to activities that teach how to count money, tell time, and identify shapes, we have an endless supply of math learning tools from which to choose. But because it’s also important for youngsters to apply their math skills in real-life ways, consider using family time as way to further his math education. This can be done at the dinner table next time hamburgers are on the menu. Have your child count how many burgers are on the grill and how many buns are in the package, then do mental subtraction to determine the difference. Or practice shape recognition by calling out circle, rectangle and triangle, and have him look around the house and identify the objects that match the shape. Pretty soon your kid will be seeing math everywhere he turns.

Third Grade Worksheets Give Kids an Academic Boost

The move to third grade can be intimidating for youngsters, as concepts in all subjects become more complicated and they’re asked to learn more independently than in the past. A good way to ease the transition and ensure your child remains on the right academic path is to print out our third grade worksheets. Not only will you find dozens of activities for every subject and skill level, but many of those activities feature amusing illustrations and cool games, making study and practice time a lot more tolerable. Because there is so much variety in these worksheets, it might be best to start by identifying the subjects in which your child is most deficient and have her target those areas first. If you start to sense frustration, though, shift gears and give her a confidence boost by having her complete worksheets in subjects where she’s most proficient. Along the way, be your kid’s biggest cheerleader. Congratulate her when she successfully finishes a difficult exercise, and encourage her to keep plugging away if she hits a speed bump. After all, when it comes to learning at a young age, a little positive reinforcement goes a long way.